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International Mass Payments for Growing Businesses

23-12-2021 | Xe | treasuryXL | LinkedIn |

Streamline your payment processes, and improve international business partner relationships. Spend more time delivering on your clients’ needs.

Business process outsourcing and business process automation are not new business models. Yet traditionally, they have been targeted at high-volume, manual tasks like data entry, document processing, and bookkeeping. Delegating international transactions to a mass payments service provider like XE saves your business, and often your recipients on each completed transaction.

One of the many benefits of working with a payment service provider which specialises in international money transfer is that we provide services based on transaction volume. A small business will often just need help to expedite the fundamental payment administration and remittance processes. a large business with significantly more concurrent transactions will typically prioritise access to a scalable payments platform that can integrate with their core financial systems.

The executive appeal of subscribing to a mass payments API through a financial services business like XE is that it provides measurable benefits, such as:

  • Cost containment by streamlining payment tasks

  • Greater efficiency and reduced errors

  • The ability to focus full-time employees on more strategic, high-value tasks

  • Reduced training and technology overhead

  • Opportunities to take advantage of volume-based discounts

Is your business looking to find savings opportunities by paying multiple international suppliers, contractors, or employees? Simultaneous payments triggered at optimal exchange rates minimises the impact of unpredictable currency value fluctuations on your bottom line. You can also initialise bulk payments when you feel the time is right, be it after business hours or on weekends.

The Right Payee, in the Right Currency, at the Right Time

XE Mass Payments services are can be made securely to beneficiaries in over 220 countries and territories, in any of 139 currencies. One of our clients increased the efficiency of their international remittances from two days to a mere five minutes.

Consider all the productive work, collaboration, and planning which can be done in those rescued hours which would have been otherwise spent filling out forms, routing payments, and reconciling accounts.

Are you ready to streamline your payment processes, and improve your relationships with your business partners overseas? Do you want to minimise administrative tasks, and spend more time delivering on your clients’ needs?

XE Mass Payments: A Proven Platform from the World’s Trusted Currency Authority

XE Mass Payment API and related services:

  • Are on par with the banks in terms of security, privacy, and regulatory compliance.

  • Rival or exceed bank services in terms of speed. We work to avoid intermediary banks wherever possible.

  • Are less costly for your business, and generally don’t carry recipient fees.

  • Are an excellent way to reduce manual keying errors.

  • Are available to your business on your schedule, during the week or on weekends.

  • Can help you qualify for discounts for prompt payment (such as 2% within 10 days)

  • Can be contracted as a stand-alone online managed service, or as an integrated API solution to interface with your company’s financial ERP and accounting applications.

  • Are a great way to avoid pitfalls many companies make when doing business with trading partners in emerging markets. Late or inaccurate payments to employees, contractors or suppliers are bad for your company’s reputation and can be disruptive to the natural flow of your business.

Here are some additional details about our Mass Payments offering.

Mass payments services are packaged for your company based on:

  • The countries where your suppliers, employees, and other beneficiaries are located

  • The volume of payments you manage per month

  • The channels through which your business payments flow, be it through our APIs or our managed service

  • Any advisory or foreign exchange services which your company needs, be it expanding your payments to emerging markets, risk management, market orders or forward contracts.


Foreign Exchange Hedging – Putting More Flow into Your Cashflow

16-12-2021 | Xe | treasuryXL | LinkedIn |

Volatility in the market creates hedging opportunities. You can more accurately forecast margins, and have peace of mind knowing your costs won’t increase.

Any business that imports or exports goods or services have a foreign exchange requirement. Depending on how large the volume of their orders and/or sales, foreign exchange can significantly impact gross margins and has the ability to derail profit.

Importing costs fluctuate with the value of the local currency – for example, the New Zealand dollar (NZD). In the past 5 years, the NZD has moved by an average of 8% per year. In that same timeframe, if your suppliers either increased or decreased their prices by this amount, most people would do everything possible to try and mitigate the downside. This is a primary value-add of foreign exchange traders and brokerages that have the best interests of their clients in mind.

How to hedge

Volatility in the market creates hedging opportunities. By hedging, you are able to more accurately forecast margins, and have peace of mind knowing your costs won’t increase. This allows you to focus on your core business functions, be they manufacturing, distribution, or otherwise.

A forward exchange contract (FEC) allows you to buy or sell a defined amount of foreign currency on a given date in the future at a defined rate. The disadvantage of an FEC is that you may miss out on favourable market movements. However, since consistently accurate crystal balls aren’t standard issue for any ForEx advisor, the hard part is knowing where the market will go.

Experience, expertise, and depth of information resources are two of the differentiating factors between XE and our competitors.

What stops hedging?

Hedging challenges arise when your forecasts aren’t reliable, and you receive inaccurate information from sales or production advisors. Or perhaps you are running a lean supply-chain and don’t want to commit tying up cash flow to an FEC.

You can incorporate hedging into your budgeting to ensure your costed rates are covered. This prevents a situation where the currency is lower than what you’ve budgeted, and potentially a loss is being made each time you purchase FX.

For exporters, there is even less appetite to hedge. This is partly because the NZD has been strong over the past 5 years against most currencies.

The importance of interest rates

Every country wants their currency lower to attain more from exports. You will hear New Zealand’s Reserve Bank (RBNZ) say they want the currency lower. In their view, having the NZD/USD rate at 65c instead of 75c is a major positive. This isn’t what importers want to hear, but it’s the reality of the foreign exchange markets.

Interest rates dictate currency movements. The RBNZ pays particular attention to inflation, wages, GDP and employment data to make their decisions. But, the NZD is at the mercy of international reserve banks, including the US Federal Reserve and the ECB (European Central Bank).

Conclusion

Volatility is here to stay. Big swings in the market will persist. It’s almost impossible to predict where the markets will move. Yet XE has the people, processes and technology to give your business the best odds of success.

It’s unfair to judge yourself on attaining the very best rate when hedging foreign exchange. Our mantra is to empower businesses to compete to their full potential in international markets.

XE works with over 6,000 clients throughout New Zealand, and several thousand more around the world to help manage foreign exchange requirements to minimise fluctuations on margins. It would be our pleasure to advise you on how to mitigate the impact of currency on your business’ cash flow.


What should you know about SWIFT system transfers?

09-12-2021 | Xe | treasuryXL | LinkedIn |

The SWIFT network is well-known and used by banks around the world, but it may not be the best channel for you to send your money transfers through.

The Society for Worldwide InterbankFinancial Telecommunication (SWIFT) network, which was founded in Belgium in 1973, handles about half of the world’s cross-border fund transfers. As international commerce has grown, the SWIFT network has grown commensurately. It handled about 2.5 million daily transactions in 1995 and more than ten times that many in 2015.

But SWIFT is not a bank. It does not even touch the money which passes along its network. Instead, SWIFT sends payment orders to correspondent accounts at member banks. As such, SWIFT is strictly a bank-to-bank transfer service.

If you’re sending a money transfer with a bank, you’ll become acquainted with the SWIFT system. But is it the best channel to send your money through? We’re not so sure.

What does the SWIFT system mean for you and your money transfers?

  • Added fees. In order to be members and transfer through the SWIFT system, banks are charged SWIFT fees. To counter this, both the recipient and the correspondent bank usually add fees to SWIFT transfers. Somebody, either the sender or the recipient or a combination of both, must pay them.

  • Bad exchange rates. There are some hidden currency transfer costs, at least in most cases. Currency exchange rates vary in different markets and at different times. Banks routinely choose the worst possible currency exchange rate. Then, they quickly move the money to another marketplace and pocket the difference.

  • Long transfer times. As mentioned above, SWIFT completes “most” of its transactions within thirty minutes. In this case, “most” means about half. Some transactions could take several days to process. Other delays, such as large transfer amounts or first-time users, could delay the process even more.

How does the SWIFT network work?

Today, SWIFT connects about 10,000 financial institutions in about 200 countries. That sounds sweeping and impressive. But most of its transfers go through fewer than two hundred banks, brokers, clearinghouses, and corporations.

Furthermore, SWIFT is the industry standard for linguistics and code, even for non-SWIFT institutions like Xe. SWIFT works with various international organizations to set content and format standards for messages and transactions. In other words, the network infrastructure usually handles codes as opposed to account numbers and other sensitive information. That’s one reason SWIFT is so secure.

Another reason the network is secure is that its three data centers in the United States, Switzerland, and the Netherlands communicate with each other via subterranean or submerged cables. These communications channels are difficult to hack.

SWIFT upgraded its network infrastructure in 2001 and again in 2008. Not coincidentally, 2008 was also the year international funds transfer prices went up significantly. As part of the upgrade, SWIFT required all member institutions to replace their bilateral key exchange encryption hardware with a Relationship Management Application. Member banks gladly passed these costs along to consumers.

How secure is the SWIFT system?

2008 was a long time ago in technological terms. The smartphone you had back then, assuming you had one, probably looked like one of those World War I field telephones compared to the one you have now. Yet 2008 was also the last time SWIFT did any major security upgrades.

The network paid the price in April 2016. Hackers used malware to steal about $81 million from the central bank in Bangladesh. The malware intercepted the supposedly unbreakable SWIFT codes and also covered the hacker’s tracks. Perhaps most disturbingly, SWIFT admitted that these thieves, or ones similarly equipped, had tried this before.

A few months later, an Ecuadorian bank sued Wells Fargo after the latter allegedly honored a $12 million fraudulent transfer. Hackers obtained canceled transaction requests, altered the amounts, and submitted them.

Questions continue about the network’s security. Some banks claimed they have lost money to hackers in much the same way. These allegations are under investigation.

Can you make money transfers without using the SWIFT system?

Yes, you can! Many banks and providers utilize the SWIFT system to send their money transfers due to its security, efficiency, and well-established reputation, but some providers instead opt to use other channels (or even create their own channels) to send money transfers.

Do you want an example of one such provider? Well, now that you mention it…

Sending money with Xe

SWIFT might be the largest international funds transfer platform in the world. But in terms of security, efficiency, privacy, and a few other areas, it falls short.

So, if you need a reliable and affordable way to send money overseas to family or friends, give Xe a try. We send money through our own money transfer channels, which means that we aren’t on the hook for additional SWIFT system fees and delays—and neither are you.

But don’t worry: our channels are still completely secure. We adhere to regulatory standards in every country that we do business in, with bank-grade security measures to ensure that your money and information are completely safe


Does Your Business Need Protection from FX Uncertainty?

| 02-12-2021 | Xe | treasuryXL | LinkedIn |

Don’t have a bank account? Want to have cash on you? In those cases, cash pickup could be the money transfer method for you.

One of the most interesting aspects of what the XE Business Solutions team does is having relationships across a broad range of industries. It helps our team curate unique insights into the various pressures and financial models being used by all the businesses we work with. The relationships our foreign exchange sales consultants build fine-tune their understanding of regional business sentiment and common international best practices.

There are many viewpoints on how to treat fast-moving FX rates. Some simply hope that the market will self-correct over time. Others make best-effort forecasts to try to understand all possible currency value directions of currency prices. From our vantage point, we see that businesses which are exposed to significant risks are more likely to achieve their objectives by employing a hedging program.

Foreign Exchange Volatility is a Universal Business Challenge

Big brands are just as susceptible to market movements as any other business segment. Currency volatility can impact profit margins if not managed correctly. Earnings reports are replete with warnings to shareholders pertaining to the value of assets and cash flows being affected by unmanaged or unexpected shifts in values of currency.

Looking deeper into hedging behaviours, enterprise-level businesses have a tendency to employ rich hedging programs and while it is by no means necessary to emulate their level of complexity; certainly the point regarding ‘best practices’ is clear.

Here are some insights on how the ‘big guys’ see ForEx risks across the globe as a result of their survey of corporations (Deloitte 2016 Global FX Survey and IMP Exchange Rate Risk Measurement and Management working paper: Issues and Approaches for Firms):

The top three reported ‘Primary hedging objectives’ were defined as:

  1. Reducing income statement volatility

  2.  Protecting cash flows

  3.  Protecting consolidated earnings

In terms of strategy, the breakdown of risk management strategies is as follows:

  • 8% of those surveyed employ a static or annual hedging programme (buying once a year)

  • 31% use a rolling hedge but a flat amount (buying monthly, quarterly etc)

  • 28% actively hedge using a rolling hedge strategy increasing over time to seek to average rates

  • 33% use ad hoc or hedging by situation

The survey found that global corporate hedging strategies consist of these approaches:

  • Hedging using a financial instrument like a forward contract or option – 89%

  • Naturally hedging through balancing buying and selling in the same currency (some or all of the exposure) – 58%

  • Passing costs to suppliers or customers – 28%

  • No FX risk management practices at all – 2%

These breakdowns further:

  • Using a FX forward or Non-deliverable forward – 92%

  • Using FX Options – 30%

  • Using specifically FX Option collars – 15%

It is always interesting to get a look into the strategies employed by others and particularly the way that large, professional companies approach managing a key part of their risk program.

The key takeaway is that almost all of the companies Deloitte surveyed are hedging using some kind of financial tool specifically designed to provide consistency and protect cash flows.

Probably a much higher percentage than many would think are using Options products and rolling hedges over on a regular basis as part of a specific policy that guides them in virtually any market condition. Some real food for thought there….

Currency Market Analysis

Here is today’s market recap:

GBPEUR – The Pound maintained its position yesterday and this morning against the Euro as many traders await details on what steps Members of Parliament will take when it opens next week. Labour has indicated they will seek and emergency debate on Brexit next week but no information regarding a no-confidence vote is yet available.

GBPUSD – The pound is expected to come under pressure in general as the suspension of parliament is seen as increasing the chances of a no-deal Brexit. With this in mind, it appears likely that we could test and break the 1.2060/1.2015 level downwards, which likely will open up losses against the Dollar of some significant ground.

EURUSD – While the trading calm remains in the pair, there is a chance hard economic data will begin to outweigh hard sentiment from the ECB. Germany reported a decline of 2.2% in Retail Sales in July (on top of a downward revision). Consumption is largely propping up the German economy and this is slowing as well. A potential risk for euro weakness exists.

Please contact us for more info about your international payments or log in.

Click here to register and save now.

 

Please Note: The information, materials, accompanying literature and documentation available on our internet site is for information purposes only and is not intended as a solicitation for funds or a recommendation to trade. XE, its officers, employees and representatives accept no liability whatsoever for any loss or damages suffered through any act or omission taken as a result of reading or interpreting any of the above information.

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Figuring Out your Company’s FX Requirements

| 25-11-2021| treasuryXL | XE | LinkedIn

There is no crystal ball that can accurately tell you the future of where a currency will trade in the short, medium or long-term.

 

When looking to partner with an FX provider, your first priority should be to evaluate the payments your business has made previously in order to get a better idea of the FX products and services that will best fit your business’ needs. And, when selecting a provider, make sure they understand your industry and the jurisdictions you are making payments to.

1. Frequency

How often are you making (or will you make) international payments? Making overseas payments costs more per transaction. The more payments you make, the more critical it is to get the cost per transaction right.

2. Amounts

The amounts you transfer affects the overall cost. Smaller amounts will have a higher margin added, therefore it’s worth determining whether you can bundle your payments to sharpen the margin you attract.

3. Timing

With exchange rates constantly fluctuating, the timing of your payments will have an impact on your overall profitability. If you do business in areas where currency valuations are highly volatile, an FX provider which can effectively advise you about the risks and opportunities of short or long-term foreign exchange contracts is ideal.

4. Industry

Each industry is different when it comes to the three factors above. Therefore, selecting a provider that understands your industry can make a big difference, as they’ll often be able to suggest the best foreign exchange service offering for your type of business.

Your business is as unique as you are. Don’t settle for generic money transfer services which treat your business as a number on a spreadsheet.

5. Geography

Finally, when selecting an FX provider, make sure they understand any regional nuances particular to the jurisdictions you are sending your money to – this will ensure your payments go through smoothly, and in a timely manner.

Taking the time to understand these five factors is the first step in taking control of your business’s FX requirements and will put you in good stead when selecting the right FX provider for your business.

Ready to learn more?

Download our essential FX Guide for Aussie and Kiwi businesses.


Simplify your global business payments

18-11-2021| treasuryXL | XE | LinkedIn

 

Whether your business needs to process 3 or 150 international payments a month, learn how you can make payments to 220+ countries within your own business applications, and benefit from:

• Faster automated payment processes
• Savings using bank-beating exchange rates
• More accurate reporting by eliminating manual errors
• Secure transactions by validating payment data before it’s sent
• Transparency by receive tracking and reporting of each payment to its destination
• Flexibility to send to multiple currencies in a single file upload

Xe enables you to achieve everything a third-party payment provider has to offer, directly from your own business applications.

 

5 reasons why integrating Xe Global Business Payments into your own business applications will help power your business:

1. Improve your Financial Reporting
Xe Global Payments within your own business platform allows you to automatically reconcile foreign currency exchange rates directly at time of transaction. This means no more duplication or transferal of data from one application to another. Greater accuracy means greater transparency and visibility on your financial reporting, enabling you to make more confident business decisions.

2. Protect supply chain relationships and staff in overseas offices
If you are paying suppliers overseas, you want to ensure that your supply chain is protected, that you have full visibility on expenses so that your customer base is not impacted by any delays or rise in cost. And if you need to pay staff overseas you want to ensure they receive the right amount, on time, every time. By using Xe Global Business Payments within your own platform, any errors with bank account details are immediately highlighted, giving you time to rectify any costly mistakes.

3. Stop paying more than you should
Xe’s preferential exchange rates typically save you typically more money than if you used your bank for your business global payments. When you streamline your payment processes using Xe Global Business Payments in your own application, you are saving time on every overseas payment. That means you can save both time and money.

4. Improve speed and accuracy of high-volume, time-sensitive payments
It’s so important to have strict data verification and validation processes. We verify payments before they’re sent, so we can quickly flag any unsuccessful payments. For example, our system has a table of rules for each of the different payout currencies we offer. If you uploaded a payment to Brazil without a bank CLABE number, it would tell you it’s missing. Sending certain currencies can be extremely problematic, so we take out the guess work and make sure payments get where they need to go.

5. Get the right specialist support
A solution can only be as good as the support it offers. At Xe, we understand the daily challenges global Finance functions face. Our support team establishes a good rapport with clients and get to grips with the practical and technical elements of resolving problems quickly and efficiently. Our experts are available around the clock, to resolve issues no matter where clients are located or what time zone they’re in.

By using Xe Global Payments within your Microsoft Dynamics 365 or Sage Intacct applications, you can streamline your international payments process, and benefit from quality customer service and support from Xe’s front and back-end operations.

 


How To Expand Your Business Overseas

11-11-2021| treasuryXL | XE | LinkedIn

As a growing business, expanding overseas can present a lot of exciting opportunities. However, it also requires some careful thought as it can seriously disrupt your existing business activities – even if only temporarily. Therefore, it’s vital that business owners looking to expand have fully understood the impact this will have on the day-to-day running of the company, as well as determining whether the rewards are going to outweigh the risks. If going overseas is the next important step for your business, that’s great news, but knowing where to start can be tricky. You need to gain a deep understanding of the competition, local market, whether you’ll need new office space and how you’ll build your international team.

That’s why we’ve put together this guide. Below, we’re going to take a look at eight steps you must take when expanding your business overseas if you hope to succeed.

Read on to find out more.

1. Perform due diligence

Following on from what we said above, before you expand overseas, it’s crucial that you understand the marketplace, competition and the risks. The best way to do this is to perform a deep dive due diligence. This should involve:

  • A market segmentation analysis to determine if your product will be well received in the local market

  • A product gap analysis when compared with other local goods or services
    Competitor analysis

  • Your market opportunity/sizing

  • How you’ll need to grow/adapt your team to cater for your international expansion

By doing so, you can determine whether this is going to be the right move for your business and your workforce whilst weighing up the risks and rewards.

2. Put together a detailed strategy and business plan

As with any new business decision – especially one of this size – a detailed strategy and business plan need to be created. This needs to take into account the specific economic, cultural, governmental and market conditions in the local area.

Your strategy should include your short, medium and long-term goals, and it should set out your metrics for measuring success. It’s also important to create a budget, tactical plan, key dates and marketing strategy.

By putting together a localised strategy in this way, you can stay on the path to success whilst ensuring that your move overseas stays in line with the overall business goals and objectives.

3. Create a frontline team

When moving your business overseas, it can be tempting to quickly try and build a local team from scratch. This can be extremely time-consuming, risky and means your expansion is not going to get off to the best start.

Instead, you should consider relocating some of your key senior staff, even if the move is just temporary. By relocating proven and talented members of your team to your overseas location, you can hit the ground running.

After all, they already know the business, so they can get things set up. They can then help with the recruiting process to ensure that you employ local people who fit with the company culture and can continue to drive the business forward. This will obviously take a bit of work and lots of incentives to have staff members be willing to relocate but taking most of the stress out of it with luggage shipping and providing temporary housing is a good start.

4. Make sure your goods or services are prepared

Your gap analysis should have highlighted any areas of weakness, so you need to take the necessary steps to get your goods or services ready for the new local marketplace. This means:

  • Making changes to ensure your goods or services stand out from existing offerings

  • Determining whether you need to localise your goods or services. For example, does the name translate OK into the local language or does it need changing?

  • Getting a patent and trademark review to ensure your ideas cannot be duplicated by another local provider

  • Conducting tests and quality assurance to ensure your goods or services are up to local standards

  • Starting to build a local logistics and distribution network

5. Determine your organisational readiness

A one size fits all approach will not work when it comes to moving your business overseas. This is because the different languages, regulations, laws, customs and cultures will impact how you implement business policies and procedures.

Therefore, you need to make sure that your business can be flexible and accommodate these differences. You also need to evaluate your current structure and whether this will work in another country.

Not only this, but you need to decide on the average salaries, compensation packages and types of benefit programs you’ll be able to offer to your workforce. Remember, if you want to attract talented local professionals, you need to offer competitive packages.

6. Create a marketing strategy

When entering a new market, you need to make sure you have a go-to marketing strategy in place to help you effectively sell your goods or services overseas. This requires a strong sales model and methodology, as well as a pricing model that reflects the local market.

You also need to make sure that your branding will be well received by your new international customer base and create a marketing strategy that shouts about this.

7. Consider your legal readiness

Just as with your organisational readiness, you also need to make sure that you have all the necessary legal documentation and regulations in place, especially because some countries can be very litigious. If you’re unsure what you need to do, it might be time to get a professional opinion before spending time and money expanding overseas.

By ensuring that you get all the right local commercial agreements in place, review any local industry regulations and just generally stay proactive, you can mitigate the risks of legal action or problems further down the line.

This also includes getting the proper tax and finance infrastructures set up so that your foreign branch of the business is adhering to all local corporate policies and procedures.

8. Start establishing relationships with local businesses

The final step in this guide is to start establishing relationships with local businesses to give your own business a strong competitive advantage.

In doing so, you can create a supporting ecosystem of complementary products and services by working closely with local providers. For example, this could be manufacturers, shipping and courier services or local banks.

Now you’re finally ready to make the leap; you should be all set up financially, legally and with a team of talented professionals ready to help expand your business.


Netflix’s ‘Squid Game’ and the 45 billion won question: “How much is that worth?”

04-11-2021| treasuryXL | XE | LinkedIn

The South Korean won has unexpectedly become the world’s second-most searched currency.

It’s safe to say that almost everyone watching ‘Squid Game’ has wondered what the cash prize is actually worth in their local currency. Searches for currency conversion of the South Korean won (KRW) to various local currencies, especially the Mexican peso (MXN) and US Dollar (USD), have skyrocketed in popularity since the show started streaming on September 17th. Being the world’s most trusted currency authority here at Xe, we saw our traffic spike over 1,000% for just those two conversions alone.

45 billion is a lot of money in any currency. But for viewers everywhere, we are here to break down that number for you!

Using Xe’s live exchange rates, 1 KRW is worth approximately 0.00084 USD, or 0.01737 MXN, or… select any currency and see for yourself! That means that the cash prize amount of 45.6 Billion Korean converts to over $38,000,000 USD.

Now, if only I could find some white Vans for my Halloween costume… Those searches spiked over 7,800%!


Why Do Currencies Fluctuate?

21-10-2021| treasuryXL | XE | LinkedIn

These days, some currency rates are jumping to all-time highs while others plunge to record lows. Exchange rates are constantly fluctuating, but what, exactly, causes a currency’s value to rise and fall? Simply put, currencies fluctuate based on supply and demand.

 

Most of the world’s currencies are bought and sold based on flexible exchange rates, meaning their prices fluctuate based on the supply and demand in the foreign exchange market. High demand for a currency or a shortage in its supply will cause an increase in price. A currency’s supply and demand are tied to a number of intertwined factors including the country’s monetary policy, the rate of inflation, and political and economic conditions.

Monetary Policy

One way a country may stimulate its economy is through its monetary policy. Many central banks attempt to control the demand for currency by increasing or decreasing the money supply and/or benchmark interest rates.

“With a low interest rate, people and businesses are more willing and able to borrow money”

The money supply is the amount of a currency in circulation. As a country’s money supply increases and the currency becomes more available, the price of borrowing the currency goes down. The interest rate is the price at which money can be borrowed. With a low interest rate, people and businesses are more willing and able to borrow money. As they continually spend this borrowed money, the economy grows. However, if there is too much money in the economy and the supply of goods and services does not increase accordingly, prices may begin to inflate.

Rate of Inflation

Another variable that heavily influences the value of a currency is the inflation rate. The inflation rate is the rate at which the general price of goods and services are increasing. While a small amount of inflation indicates a healthy economy, too much of an increase can cause economic instability, which may ultimately lead to the currency’s depreciation.

A country’s inflation rate and interest rates heavily influence its economy. If the inflation rate gets too high, the central bank may counteract the problem by raising the interest rate. This encourages people to stop spending and instead save their money. It also stimulates foreign investment and increases the amount of capital entering the marketplace, which leads to an increased demand for currency. Therefore, an increase in a country’s interest rate leads to an appreciation of its currency. Similarly, a decrease in an interest rate causes depreciation of the currency.

Political and Economic Conditions

The economic and political conditions of a country can also cause a currency’s value to fluctuate. While investors enjoy high interest rates, they also value the predictability of an investment. This is why currencies from politically stable and economically sound countries generally have higher demand, which, in turn, leads to higher exchange rates.

Markets continually monitor the current and expected future economic conditions of countries. In addition to money supply changes, interest rates, and inflation rates, other key economic indicators include gross domestic product, unemployment rate, housing starts, and trade balance (a country’s total exports less its total imports). If these indicators show a strong and growing economy, its currency will tend to appreciate as demand increases.

Similarly, strong political conditions impact currency values positively. If a country is in the midst of political unrest or global tensions, the currency becomes less attractive and demand falls. On the other hand, if a market sees the introduction of a new government that suggests stability or strong future economic growth, a currency may appreciate as people buy it based on the good news.

Conclusion

There is no single indicator that explains exactly why a currency has fluctuated or predicts with certainty what its price will do. Instead, many factors related to demand and supply affect currency values. What has been shown is that more knowledge and understanding of market conditions and their implications for currency fluctuations leads to more accurate predictions.


#9 Not Searching For Alternatives

14-10-2021 | treasuryXL | Xe

This is the last part of XE’s ‘9 Mistakes Your Business Should Avoid’ journey. We have reflected upon Currency risk mistakes that companies worldwide often make. It is important to learn from these mistakes in order to avoid them. The message of this manual is that paying attention to foreign currency can deliver benefits ranging from increased value to better Risk management. To reap the benefits, it is important to work with a currency provider who understands what you need and who can help you achieve your goals. It is possible that your current currency provider can provide that, but if you don’t look around you won’t know if it might be better.

“Aandacht besteden aan vreemde valuta kan veel voordelen opleveren, variërend van meer waarde tot beter risicobeheer.”

Niet rondkijken naar alternatieve valutaservices is dan ook een enorme fout. Het is mogelijk dat u daardoor betere koersen misloopt, geen gebruik kunt maken van diensten waarvan u het bestaan niet kende en valuta niet strategisch kunt benaderen zoals zou moeten als praktijk en beleid een afspiegeling zouden moeten zijn van uw handelsomgeving. Ga er niet van uit dat de diensten die uw bank verleent, van het niveau en de kwaliteit
zijn die u nodig hebt. Het is gemakkelijk om bij uw bank te blijven en de zekerheid te hebben van een vertrouwde provider. Maar uw bank kan wellicht niet dezelfde verscheidenheid aan valutadiensten bieden als een gespecialiseerde provider die alleen vreemde valuta doet. Dat wil niet zeggen dat u de hype van concurrerende providers moet volgen. Als bijvoorbeeld een koers te goed klinkt om waar te zijn, dan is dat ook vrijwel zeker het geval. Wees ook sceptisch als providers u aanmoedigen om te gaan speculeren op valutamarkten of u ervan proberen te overtuigen dat ze koersschommelingen kunnen voorspellen.

Het klinkt misschien tegenstrijdig, maar de beste hedgepositie is degene die geen voordeel oplevert: een verzekering die u afsluit voor het ergste geval, terwijl u hoopt op het beste, namelijk dat de valutamarkten niet in uw nadeel bewegen. In werkelijkheid biedt zelfs een geslaagde hedge slechts wat meer tijd. Wat u nodig hebt, is een provider die de tijd neemt om erachter te komen wat de specifieke eisen van uw bedrijf zijn in plaats van een standaardservice te bieden. Competitieve koersen spelen natuurlijk een rol bij uw zoektocht, maar moeten zeker niet uw enige overweging zijn. U hebt een provider nodig die een oplossing op maat kan ontwikkelen die aan al uw eisen voldoet en u kan helpen om uw toekomstige risico effectiever te beheren. Neem met minder geen genoegen.

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