COVID-19 vaccine rollout: how might it impact global currencies?

14-01-2021 | treasuryXL | XE |

As 2020 drew to a close, news broke of multiple vaccinations for the COVID-19 virus, and each nation began discussing its plan for distributing the vaccine.

At this time, we are still in the early stages of the vaccine rollout, and many nations around the world are still in the process of vaccinating their highest-priority individuals and preparing for the eventual larger-scale distribution.

As some start to dream about a return to life outside of lockdowns and social distancing, others are wondering what the news of the vaccinations—and their eventual distribution—could mean for major global currencies and economies.

Has anything recently impacted the US dollar?

Several recent happenings have led to an impact on the USD.

First, the dollar may see a very short term sentiment impacted by Donald Trump’s removal from office. President elect Joe Biden has stated that he will announce an economic plan on Thursday, 14 January, to navigate through the COVID-19 pandemic and an eventual reopening. While the specifics of this plan are not known at this time, we do know that this plan will be worth “trillions” of dollars and will entail massive infrastructure spend.

Recent minutes from the Fed have shown us that the US Central Bank quantitative easing (QE), and that interest rates will continue to be low for the foreseeable future.

Finally, U.S. treasury Yields recently rose to 10 month highs.

What does this mean for the dollar?

The above events resulted in an end to the recent weaker dollar. Instead, the dollar has been strengthening against its major trading counter parties.

How are other currencies being impacted by the vaccine roll out?

The sooner a nation can widely distribute immunizations, achieve herd immunity and therefore see its economy back and open for business, the better it will be for their economy and currency.

It is currently estimated that once 70-90% of the population has been vaccinated, the sooner lock down restrictions and the “handbrake” on the economy can be released. Because of this, markets are tracking the current vaccine numbers and the planned numbers in the weeks and months ahead as an indicator of which economies will bounce back and which currencies will strengthen first.

Currently, the US dollar and the British pound are poised to see positive change. As of January 8, 2021, the United States ranks 4th in the list of vaccination doses per country, with 2.02 doses administered per 100 people in the population. The United Kingdom ranks 6th, with 1.94 doses per 100 members of the population as of January 3, 2021.

On the other hand, as a result of Europe’s comparatively slow start to the vaccine roll-out, the Euro currently appears to be in a vulnerable position.

What can you do?

If the past year has demonstrated anything, it’s that one can never predict what may happen. The most important thing that you can do is ensure that you’re prepared for market volatility and market motion in all directions.

 

Get in touch with XE.com

About XE.com

XE can help safeguard your profit margins and improve cashflow through quantifying the FX risk you face and implementing unique strategies to mitigate it. XE Business Solutions provides a comprehensive range of currency services and products to help businesses access competitive rates with greater control.

Deciding when to make an international payment and at what rate can be critical. XE Business Solutions work with businesses to protect bottom-line from exchange rate fluctuations, while the currency experts and risk management specialists act as eyes and ears in the market to protect your profits from the world’s volatile currency markets.

Your company money is safe with XE, their NASDAQ listed parent company, Euronet Worldwide Inc., has a multi billion-dollar market capitalization, and an investment grade credit rating. With offices in the UK, Canada, Europe, APAC and North America they have a truly global coverage.

Are you curious to know more about XE?
Maurits Houthoff, senior business development manager at XE.com, is always in for a cup of coffee, mail or call to provide you detailed information.

 

 

Visit XE.com

Visit XE partner page

 

 

 

How FX Providers Can Help Prepare You for Market Motion

07-01-2021 | treasuryXL | XE |

Currency market moves caught you off-guard? You’re not alone. By working with a knowledgeable FX provider, you can minimize the effects on your business.

Woman looking at financial graphs

No matter when you check, the currency markets are constantly moving. Currency values are subject to drastic change seemingly at the drop of a hat.

Volatility in the financial markets isn’t random; changes in currency values are a direct result of real-world factors. Examples of the real-world events that can lead to increases and decreases in currency values include:

  • Natural disasters

  • Recessions

  • Inflation

  • Interest rates

  • Political happenings

It’s not uncommon for the markets to have slower periods of muted volatility, low interest rates, and steady returns in equity markets. But on the other hand, drastic changes can strike seemingly out of nowhere.

Volatility in the markets can have powerful, tangible impacts on businesses around the world. Corporate finance departments, treasury groups, CFOs, and business owners will be the ones left to face the consequences.

What could this mean for your business? Volatility in the markets can potentially:

  • Raise import costs

  • Reduce export sales margins

  • Make your product less competitive

  • Possibly disrupt your business plans for 2020 and beyond.

Manage FX risk with Xe

Your corporation doesn’t need to wait until the markets have already started moving to take action. FX volatility is a risk you can manage, and comprehensive FX risk management measures can help your organization to reduce the impacts of market volatility and account for future shifts in the market.

Many organizations lack FX risk management programs. Some feel that FX risk isn’t a major risk to their organization, while others lack the expertise or resources to implement the effective measures that their organization needs. Partnering with a knowledgeable FX provider can help your organization to manage its currency risk.

At Xe, we have been operating in the currency business for over 25 years as a knowledgeable authority. We have extensive knowledge of the markets and comprehensive product offerings including FX risk management tools to to help you and your corporation manage your currency risk with expert, tailored solutions.

 

Get in touch with XE.com

About XE.com

XE can help safeguard your profit margins and improve cashflow through quantifying the FX risk you face and implementing unique strategies to mitigate it. XE Business Solutions provides a comprehensive range of currency services and products to help businesses access competitive rates with greater control.

Deciding when to make an international payment and at what rate can be critical. XE Business Solutions work with businesses to protect bottom-line from exchange rate fluctuations, while the currency experts and risk management specialists act as eyes and ears in the market to protect your profits from the world’s volatile currency markets.

Your company money is safe with XE, their NASDAQ listed parent company, Euronet Worldwide Inc., has a multi billion-dollar market capitalization, and an investment grade credit rating. With offices in the UK, Canada, Europe, APAC and North America they have a truly global coverage.

Are you curious to know more about XE?
Maurits Houthoff, senior business development manager at XE.com, is always in for a cup of coffee, mail or call to provide you detailed information.

 

 

Visit XE.com

Visit XE partner page

 

 

 

What to know about receiving a money transfer

24-12-2020 | treasuryXL | XE |

Just like sending one, receiving an international money transfer is quick and simple. Here’s what you’ll need to know about receiving your money transfer.

Need to send money overseas? You’re in luck. There is no shortage of resources available to help people send money electronically across national borders. And it’s understandable: this process is often cumbersome and difficult to understand.

Now, if you’re receiving the transfer? Not so much. There is very little out there to help recipients. It’s almost like companies assume that recipients are financially savvy and they already know everything, or that receiving a money transfer couldn’t potentially be confusing for a first-time recipient.

At Xe, we assume nothing. We’re here to offer step-by-step assistance for both senders and recipients. Our mission is to complete international electronic funds transfers as efficiently as possible, and make the process as quick and easy as possible for anyone who needs to do it.

We’ll go into further detail below, but here are the basics of what you’ll need to know as someone expecting an international money transfer:

  1. Have a bank account

  2. Provide the necessary information

  3. Wait for the money to transfer

  4. Watch your bank account

1. Have a bank account

A significant number of readers took a deep breath when they saw that requirement. About one in ten American adults do not have a bank account. They only use cash or they only use prepaid debit cards. These alternatives are usually just fine, but an electronic money transfer is different. No cash changes hands, and the paying party usually cannot add funds to a debit card.

Most of these people are able to open bank accounts. The minimum requirements are not terribly burdensome. Instead, fear keeps many of these people from opening accounts. They are afraid their credit scores are not high enough or they are subject to a bank account levy order.

Yes, many bank accounts, especially interest-bearing accounts, have minimum credit score requirements. These minimum requirements are also rather high. However, many banks also offer no credit check bank accounts. Typically, these banks do not run ChexSystem reports either. So, the current bank does not know if you owe money to another bank. These accounts usually have rather high fees and other stipulations. But, even if you have the world’s lowest credit score, a bank account is probably available (though bank account levies are another matter).

2. Provide the necessary information

Many people do not like to share their personal information with anyone for any reason. We understand that attitude; there are quite a few scammers out there. However, if you want to receive an money transfer, you’ll need to give the sender some information. We can’t transfer money if we don’t know where to transfer it, after all!

The requirements vary according to the transfer platform. If you’ll be receiving an Xe money transfer, your sender will need:

  • Your name and address. Use your legal name (the name connected to your bank account) and not the name you go by. Furthermore, most financial institutions require recipients to have physical addresses as opposed to post office box numbers. This is for security and anti-money laundering purposes.

  • Your country. A no-brainer, right? But there are two Chinas and two Koreas. Some people live in breakaway republics, such as South Sudan and Tigray, that are not universally recognized. Many also people live in disputed zones which are claimed by multiple countries, such as the India-Pakistan border. Bottom line: the country must match the sender’s financial institution’s records.

  • Your bank information. We need to know it so we know where to deposit the money. This data usually includes:

    • Your bank name

    • Your bank account number

    • SWIFT or BIC code (which you can get with a quick Google search)

If possible, try not to send this information via unencrypted cell phone text message. Use email or something more secure. And don’t forget to double-check your information, especially account numbers. It’s very easy to transpose digits or make another minor error that could have a big impact. If that happens, you’ll need to wait even longer to receive the transfer, and odds are, that’s not what you want.

3. Wait for the money to transfer

Domestic transfers are usually almost instant. We get nervous if PayPal takes more than thirty seconds to move money. A few international transactions are almost that fast, but most take more time.

Currency conversion accounts for much of this delay. There are many different currency markets that convert U.S. dollars to Mexican pesos, Italian liras to Russian rubles, and so on. These markets charge different fees. Frequently, the transferring financial institution looks for the highest price, adds that fee to the transaction, uses a lower-priced market, and pockets the difference.

Not so at Xe. Our international funds transfer fees are entirely transparent. Nothing happens under the table. So, you know how much money you are going to receive before the sender actually sends it.

Network infrastructure also accounts for some delays. Many banks have excellent services for their local customers, but they do not handle very many international transfers. These transfers are often risky, largely because of the aforementioned international recognition and boundary issues.

Once again, these delays are usually not a problem at Xe. International funds transfers are all we do, so we know how to handle them efficiently and securely (another reason why international transfers can take a little longer—we’re ensuring everything is secure before we transfer).

Generally, Xe transfers require between 1-4 business days to complete (though most transfers are complete within 24 hours, and some take just a few minutes). That’s about the same speed as a domestic PayPal bank transfer.

But you won’t need to resort to guesswork. When your sender confirms their transfer, they’ll be given an expected completion date, and update that time estimate if necessary by email. The sender usually has the most up-to-date information, so check with them!

4. Watch your bank account

International transfers are entirely electronic. We typically send alerts to senders when we begin processing transfers, if there are any hiccups, and when the transfer is complete. We normally also send completion alerts to recipients, assuming we have a good email address.

The best way to know when a transfer is complete is to watch your bank account activity. Occasionally, recipient financial institutions place holds on these transactions, but that’s between you and your bank.

Get in touch with XE.com

About XE.com

XE can help safeguard your profit margins and improve cashflow through quantifying the FX risk you face and implementing unique strategies to mitigate it. XE Business Solutions provides a comprehensive range of currency services and products to help businesses access competitive rates with greater control.

Deciding when to make an international payment and at what rate can be critical. XE Business Solutions work with businesses to protect bottom-line from exchange rate fluctuations, while the currency experts and risk management specialists act as eyes and ears in the market to protect your profits from the world’s volatile currency markets.

Your company money is safe with XE, their NASDAQ listed parent company, Euronet Worldwide Inc., has a multi billion-dollar market capitalization, and an investment grade credit rating. With offices in the UK, Canada, Europe, APAC and North America they have a truly global coverage.

Are you curious to know more about XE?
Maurits Houthoff, senior business development manager at XE.com, is always in for a cup of coffee, mail or call to provide you detailed information.

 

 

Visit XE.com

Visit XE partner page

 

 

 

What is a Unique Transaction Reference (UTR) number?

17-12-2020 | treasuryXL | XE |

Making a bank transaction or money transfer to or from India? Then you’ll need a UTR number. Here’s what it is, what it does, and how to find yours.

If you’ve ever made any inter-bank transactions in India, you’re probably familiar with UTR numbers. If you haven’t but plan on making transactions in the future, this number is a key ingredient that you’ll need if you want to make any kind of money transfer. So, what exactly is a UTR number and why is it important to your transactions?

What is a UTR number in India?

In India, “UTR number” means Unique Transaction Reference number. This number is used to identify a specific bank transaction in India. All banks in India use UTR numbers for all types of money transfer. Every UTR number is unique and each is generated to identify each fund transfer. UTR numbers in India are generated by the banks that initiate the transfer. You can easily use the UTR number to track the status of your transactions.

How do I find a UTR number?

Where exactly can you find your UTR number for each transaction? All you have to do is look at your bank statement for your UTR number. The UTR number is listed as “Ref no.” just below each transaction details. UTR numbers in India often look like this:

XXXXR7310682908954385XX

The few characters of each UTR number usually vary depending on the bank that generates them.

One of the quickest and most convenient methods of getting a specific transaction’s UTR number is from your account statement. You can easily download or just view this statement via your bank’s mobile app or internet banking. The UTR number is the 22 or 16 characters usually next to the transaction date.

What’s the importance of a UTR number in India?

The importance of a UTR number in India is to recognize and keep an eye on financial transactions. Banks can use UTR numbers to help you track your fund transfers if they are delayed, stuck, or if you intend to refer to any previous transaction for whatever reasons.

For instance, if you send some amount of money to someone and he or she claims the money wasn’t delivered or the amount was different, the bank that facilitates the transaction can use the UTR number to track it and to resolve the issue easily.

UTR numbers are generated in India when money is transferred between two banks. You can use two key methods to transfer funds between accounts held in various banks in India. The first is the National Electronic Fund Transfer normally known as NEFT. The other is the Real Time Gross Settlement known as the RTGS.

When you make NEFT or RTGS transactions in India, UTR numbers are generated. Though NEFT transactions aren’t processed instantly. Rather, they are processed in batches which means the fund transfer isn’t completed instantly. Currently in India, NEFT is done in half hourly batches from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. on weekdays and working Saturdays.

In contrast, when you make a money transfer using RTGS in India, the fund transfer is processed instantly. As soon as you transfer funds via RTGS, the money is deposited to the recipient’s account within a period of two hours. As such, RTGS is the fastest process for transferring funds from one bank to another. Nonetheless, you can only use RTGS when the amount of money you’re transferring is less than Rs 2,00,000.

How to identify the UTR number of RTGS transactions

RTGS transactions UTR numbers are 22 characters long while NEFT transactions UTR numbers are 16 characters long. Each of the two types of bank transactions have a unique UTR number format. The UTR number format for RTGS transaction is:

XXXXRCYYYYMMDD########

Here’s a simple breakdown of the UTR number of RTGS transactions:

  • XXXX – indicates IFSC (this is the first 4 characters) and is the bank code of the sender

  • R – indicates RTGS system

  • C – indicates the transaction channel

  • YYYYMMDD – indicates the date of the transaction in this order: year, month, and day

  • ######## – indicates the sequence number

How to find the UTR number of a NEFT transaction

As we mentioned earlier, you can find the UTR number of any transaction by checking the detailed account statement via the online banking section of your bank. So, how can you see the UTR number of a specific NEFT transaction? All you have to do is click on the transaction details or narration. You will see a detailed description of the said transaction.

You can easily identify every type of transaction by the format of their UTR number. As we mentioned earlier, the UTR number of NEFT transactions is 16 characters long. You can easily use the UTR number of a NEFT transaction to track the status of the transaction.

How to use a UTR number to track your transaction status in India

If your NEFT transfer is delayed, you may check the status of the transaction by using the UTR number. Or in the event that your account has been debited for a specific transaction but the recipient is yet to receive the fund, you can easily contact the bank’s customer support asking them to track the transaction via the UTR number.

Another option is to reach out to your assigned Relationship Manager asking them to track the status of the transaction using the UTR number.

Here are other methods of tracking the status of your transaction using the UTR number:

  • Visit your bank’s mobile app or internet banking account

  • Check the previous transfer section

  • Search for the specific transaction with the UTR number

  • The status of the transaction will be displayed

 

Get in touch with XE.com

About XE.com

XE can help safeguard your profit margins and improve cashflow through quantifying the FX risk you face and implementing unique strategies to mitigate it. XE Business Solutions provides a comprehensive range of currency services and products to help businesses access competitive rates with greater control.

Deciding when to make an international payment and at what rate can be critical. XE Business Solutions work with businesses to protect bottom-line from exchange rate fluctuations, while the currency experts and risk management specialists act as eyes and ears in the market to protect your profits from the world’s volatile currency markets.

Your company money is safe with XE, their NASDAQ listed parent company, Euronet Worldwide Inc., has a multi billion-dollar market capitalization, and an investment grade credit rating. With offices in the UK, Canada, Europe, APAC and North America they have a truly global coverage.

Are you curious to know more about XE?
Maurits Houthoff, senior business development manager at XE.com, is always in for a cup of coffee, mail or call to provide you detailed information.

 

 

Visit XE.com

Visit XE partner page

 

 

 

Countdown to January 1 — How a Brexit deal may impact the currency markets

10-12-2020 | treasuryXL | XE |

Uncertainty continues to dominate the value of GBP, and the next few weeks are a critical time for negotiations which could see the value rise or fall depending on the type of outcome.

The United Kingdom officially left the European Union on 31 January, but since that time has remained part of the EU while a final Brexit deal is negotiated. On 1 January 2021, those ties will be severed – and it would seem we are no closer to a deal which will impact trade and travel agreements.

This uncertainty continues to dominate the value of GBP, and the next few weeks are a critical time for negotiations which could see the value rise or fall depending on the type of outcome. Whatever the result of the outcome, it will likely cause movement in the currency markets, and lead to changes in the value of GBP (and potentially other world currencies as well).

Volatility in the currency markets can impact individuals and businesses alike. Are you prepared for what could happen? And what can you look to do if you need to make a currency transfer over the coming weeks?

What’s the current market outlook?

At this time? Hard to say.

If we look at how the market is predicting the outcome of negotiations, and remove any COVID-19 vaccine impact from the levels we see today, there is much uncertainty from economists and currency traders alike.

When there is a firm outcome, we can expect to see volatility in the market. Right now, there are several possible outcomes that we could see in the coming weeks, each one potentially having a different impact on the currency markets.

What are the potential outcomes, and what market impacts could they have?

There are a number of scenarios that could pan out over the following weeks.

1. A ‘bare bones’ deal covering key goods only

At the moment, the market looks to expect, in the very least, a deal regarding manufacturing. For example, trade agreements on goods such as food and pharma and this bare bones deal appears to be priced into the levels we are seeing currently.

Expected levels: Same as present

2. Extension of the transition phase

There could potentially be an agreement to extend the transition period rather than strike a hard ‘no deal’ outcome if negotiations reach stalemate. This could result in positive levels for GBP, which could then weaken as we navigate more uncertainty once again.

Expected levels: USD 1.3500 EUR 1.1200

3. No deal

If there is a firm ‘no deal’ outcome, there could be a significant shift in the value of GBP for the foreseeable future as we seek to understand the wider impact on EU trade and the wider economy.

Expected levels: USD 1.2700 EUR 1.0700

4. Deal agreed

If a deal is struck which leaves no stone unturned and all details covered, this certainty could result in a positive move for GBP which could be sustained well into the first part of 2021.

Expected levels: USD 1.4000 EUR 1.1700

What can you do?

There’s no predicting the future. The best thing you can do right now is ensure that you’ll be prepared for volatility in the currency markets, whichever direction the motion.

 

Get in touch with XE.com

About XE.com

XE can help safeguard your profit margins and improve cashflow through quantifying the FX risk you face and implementing unique strategies to mitigate it. XE Business Solutions provides a comprehensive range of currency services and products to help businesses access competitive rates with greater control.

Deciding when to make an international payment and at what rate can be critical. XE Business Solutions work with businesses to protect bottom-line from exchange rate fluctuations, while the currency experts and risk management specialists act as eyes and ears in the market to protect your profits from the world’s volatile currency markets.

Your company money is safe with XE, their NASDAQ listed parent company, Euronet Worldwide Inc., has a multi billion-dollar market capitalization, and an investment grade credit rating. With offices in the UK, Canada, Europe, APAC and North America they have a truly global coverage.

Are you curious to know more about XE?
Maurits Houthoff, senior business development manager at XE.com, is always in for a cup of coffee, mail or call to provide you detailed information.

 

 

Visit XE.com

Visit XE partner page

 

 

 

What is the Interbank exchange rate, and why does it matter?

03-12-2020 | treasuryXL | XE |

Have you sent money overseas with a bank, or are you planning to? Then it’s important that you understand what the interbank exchange rate is and how it might cost you more money.

In a survey earlier this year, 74.8% of you stated that you preferred using banks to send your money overseas (even if you used Xe to check the rates beforehand). Here’s the problem: the rates you see with Xe are not the rates that you’ll get when you choose to use the banks for your money transfers. And while we’ll get deeper into it later, we just want to let you know—the exchange rates the banks use will likely end up costing you more money.

Every foreign exchange and money transfer provider will have their own rates. When banks exchange money with one another, they use what’s called the interbank exchange rate. What is that, why do they use it, and what does that mean for you? Let’s explore that.

What is the interbank exchange?

The interbank exchange market, simply put, is where the banks exchange currencies with one another. It’s the top-level foreign exchange market. The Electronic Broking Service, which is a division of CES Financial, and Thomson Reuters are the two biggest names in the electronic foreign exchange market. This market is largely informal. There is no central trading location and no regulatory oversight body.

Central banks in different countries usually set domestic interbank exchange rates. Since the Federal Reserve is the closest thing to a central bank in the U.S., the Fed determines the exchange rate for transfers which originate in the U.S.

On any given day, the forex (foreign exchange market) handles about $5 trillion USD in transactions, making it the world’s largest financial market.

What about the Interbank exchange rate?

It’s exactly what you’d think it is—it’s the rate that banks use when they exchange large quantities of currency with each other. There’s no singular, universal interbank exchange rate—each bank can and will set their own rate, and the rates will naturally fluctuate in response to fluctuations in currency values.

Who determines the Interbank rate?

This fee, which can also be known as the spot rate, mid-market rate, or real exchange rate, often fluctuates minute by minute. In the United States, the Federal Reserve controls this fee, as well as the interest rate. In 2008, at the beginning of the Great Recession, the Federal reserve slashed the foreign transfer rate to .05 percent, in order to encourage funds transfer and investments. Since then, the prime rate has inched up to about 2.5 percent. But, as with interest rates, the prime foreign transfer rate is hardly ever available to consumers.

In everyday terms, the basic rule is that the Interbank foreign transfer rate is the midpoint between the selling rate and buying rate for a particular form of currency at a particular time. Currency brokers usually determine this rate, which is one reason is so subjective. Other factors which influence the fee amount include:

  • Bid-ask spread, which is a subset of supply and demand,

  • Domestic and foreign trade deficit or trade surplus,

  • Inflation and interest rates in a particular place,

  • Economic and political stability, or the lack thereof, and

  • Size of government debt.

Bad news on any of these fronts usually causes transfer rates to increase dramatically. Good news typically reduces the rate, but the effect is not as dramatic. So, based on this knowledge and the current official interbank foreign transfer rate, which a cursory Google search should reveal, you can estimate what the consumer rate should be. Use this estimate when you shop around to find the lowest fee.

In 2019, the Fed stated that it planned to keep the interbank exchange rate at 2.5 percent at least through 2021. The coronavirus outbreak might convince the Fed to reduce the rate. Or, the opposite could happen. The Fed could suddenly decide to raise the rate, largely based on the aforementioned factors.

These factors are important because the interbank exchange rate is not just a supply-and-demand issue. The Fed manipulates the rate to further its monetary policy goals. These goals could change quickly, as the Fed Board of Governors is populated by political appointees.

What this means to you

Technically, a few large international banks, such as Chase, HSBC, and Citibank, can offer their customers the prime interbank exchange rate. But this rate is only available to customers with excellent credit who make gargantuan transfers, like payroll transfers.

The aforementioned interbank transfer rate markup varies, but it is usually between 4 and 6 percent. If you regularly send money overseas, these nickels and dimes quickly add up to quarters and dollars.

Why is the interbank exchange rate marked up?

The rise of PayPal and other FinTechs, along with increased regulatory scrutiny, is expected to decrease banks’ income. Most likely, user fees will make up the difference. Domestic account fees, mostly NSF charges and non-bank ATM charges, make up the bulk of these fees. When it comes to foreign electronic funds transfers, the interbank exchange rate takes center stage.

Foreign electronic transfer fees are a bit like interest rates. The prime interest rate, which is the fee the Federal Reserve charges to loan money to banks, is always lower than the consumer interest rate. Since the Fed also sets the interbank exchange rate in the United States, the procedure is similar. The interbank exchange rate, which is the fee Wall Street bankers charge for huge funds transfers, is always lower than the consumer rate.

Generally, financial institutions raise the interbank exchange rate partially because they can, and partially because they fear the risks of international funds transfers.

The “spread”, and how it impacts what you get from your money transfers

Perhaps the most important interbank exchange rate fee might not appear in your transaction detail proposal or statement. The exchange bank works with currency bid and ask prices.

  • The bid price is the selling price,

  • The ask price is the buying price.

The difference between these two prices, which is often substantial, is called the spread. The spread allows currency brokers to buy your currency at a discount and sell it at a profit to a third party in another country.

The spread is like a surcharge which does not appear in the transaction detail. Assume you send $1,000 USD to Russia. The recipient probably expects to receive ₽7,650, minus the transfer fee, which is probably between 6.5 and 10.5 percent. That’s already a pretty hefty fee. However, because of the spread, your friend or colleague in Moscow could receive substantially less.

In many cases, brokers make more money off the spread than they make off the transfer fee. That’s especially true if it is a relatively slow day on the market, as are most Mondays, Tuesdays, and Wednesdays. During these periods, the lower number of buy-sell orders significantly increases the spread, at least in many cases.

Additionally, currency is the most liquid of all traded financial assets. Liquidity, or the lack thereof, is one of the most important spread factors.

 

Get in touch with XE.com

About XE.com

XE can help safeguard your profit margins and improve cashflow through quantifying the FX risk you face and implementing unique strategies to mitigate it. XE Business Solutions provides a comprehensive range of currency services and products to help businesses access competitive rates with greater control.

Deciding when to make an international payment and at what rate can be critical. XE Business Solutions work with businesses to protect bottom-line from exchange rate fluctuations, while the currency experts and risk management specialists act as eyes and ears in the market to protect your profits from the world’s volatile currency markets.

Your company money is safe with XE, their NASDAQ listed parent company, Euronet Worldwide Inc., has a multi billion-dollar market capitalization, and an investment grade credit rating. With offices in the UK, Canada, Europe, APAC and North America they have a truly global coverage.

Are you curious to know more about XE?
Maurits Houthoff, senior business development manager at XE.com, is always in for a cup of coffee, mail or call to provide you detailed information.

 

 

Visit XE.com

Visit XE partner page

 

 

 

What are BIC/ SWIFT codes, how do you find them, and how do they work?

26-11-2020 | treasuryXL | XE |

Not sure where to find this key ingredient to an international money transfer? Our guide will let you know about SWIFT and BIC codes inside and out.

To send or receive money internationally, your bank or any other financial institution must know where to send the money – but how do they know? Make way, for this is where a BIC/ SWIFT code comes into the scene! If you’ve ever initiated a money transfer with Xe or read our guide to sending money, you might’ve seen that you’ll need a BIC or SWIFT code. But what is that, and where would you find it?

Starting from what a SWIFT/ BIC code is and why you need it to how you can find it easily and use it for transferring money globally, our guide will let you know everything about this code inside out. Ready, get set, go!

What is a BIC or SWIFT Code?

BIC stands for Bank Identifier Code, and SWIFT stands for the Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunications. Sometimes, people use the terms “BIC” and “SWIFT” interchangeably. A SWIFT code or SWIFT ID typically identifies banks and other financial institutions worldwide, for international transactions. More specifically, it says who and where these institutions are, so that your money goes to the correct place – you might even think of it as a global identity card for banks.

The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) recognizes and approves SWIFT codes for financial and non-financial institutions. Right now, there are over 40,000 live SWIFT codes in the world.

What does a BIC/ SWIFT code look like?

SWIFT/ BIC codes contain 8-11 characters that identify your city, country, bank, and the branch of your bank. The code may look something like this: AAAABBCCXXX

All muddled up? Let’s get this BIC format straight:

  • AAAA: 4-letter bank code that’s usually a shortened version of your bank’s name.

  • BB: 2-letter country code that represents the country in which the bank’s located.

  • CC: 2-character location code, pointing to the place where the bank’s head office is situated. It’s made up of letters and numbers.

  • XXX: 3-digit branch code that specifies a particular branch of the bank, usually the bank’s headquarters. These last 3 digits are optional, though.

To help you understand better, we’ve listed out the BIC/ SWIFT codes for a few large banks from around the world:

  • Scotiabank (Canada): NOSCCATTXXX

  • Charles Schwab Bank (US): CSCHUS6SXXX

  • Bank of England: BKENGB2LXXX

  • State Bank of India: SBININBBXXX

Why do I need a BIC/ SWIFT code?

If you want to send money around the world, you’ll almost always need to use a SWIFT/ BIC code. That’s because money transfers technically don’t actually transfer money around the world. Banks securely transmit information to one another through the SWIFT system or their other channels, which lets them know where the money should come from (which account should be debited), and which account should be credited with the money. In short, without this code, your bank won’t know where exactly they should send your money to.

So, it’s important for a bank on one side of the world to find the right bank on the other side, when it comes to international wire transfers, even when you use an international money transfer app like Xe, you’ll have to enter the BIC/ SWIFT code of the recipient’s bank for wiring money to the recipient, because the money will travel from your bank account to your recipient’s bank account.

How do I find my SWIFT/ BIC code?

Don’t worry, you have a few options.

  • Check the bank statements

You can usually find your bank’s BIC/ SWIFT code in your bank account statements. If you’re using an online bank, log into your digital bank account to easily view your bank statement.

  • Check the bank’s official website

Visit the bank’s website and check their Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) section, international wire transfers, and other related links for their BIC/ SWIFT code. If there’s a search feature on the website, enter “SWIFT code” in the search box.

  • Contact your bank

In case you still can’t find the BIC/ SWIFT code, reach out to your bank via live chat, phone, social media, or email.

How do I verify a SWIFT code?

When sending or receiving money, always cross-check the BIC/ SWIFT code and other details with the recipient or your bank before you or the sender sends the money.

But why should you cross-check it?

As a matter of fact, if you enter a SWIFT code that doesn’t exist, the bank should reverse the payment you’ve made, and return your money. They’ll be charging a specific fee for that, though, and it might take some time before you get your money back.

As soon as it hits you that you’ve entered the wrong code to send money internationally (uh-oh), get in touch with your bank right away. They may be able to cancel the transaction, so keep your fingers crossed.

You can avoid such a scenario if you make sure that the BIC/ SWIFT code has:

  • No typing mistakes

You might think entering a SWIFT code is the work of a moment. But when you finally type it, character by character, it might seem as long as a marathon. Since it’s easy to make a mistake while typing in the code, try to copy and paste the code whenever possible.

  • The correct format

Always stick to the format of the BIC/ SWIFT code that the recipient has given you. For example, don’t type the country code before entering the bank code. And remember, there shouldn’t be any spaces between the characters in the code.

How do I transfer money using a SWIFT code via money transfer apps (like Xe)?

Once you sign up on online money transfer apps like Xe, you need to link your bank account directly to the app. After that, you can send money straight to the recipient’s bank account through a wire transfer, no matter where in the world he or she may be. You’ll usually have to follow these steps for wiring money between banks via Xe:

  • Log in.

  • Confirm which currencies you’d want to exchange. You can use Xe’s free Currency Converter tool for a quick check on the mid-market rate.

  • Enter the amount you wish to send.

  • Enter the recipient’s name and address.

  • Enter the recipient’s bank details, including the BIC/ SWIFT code and the International Bank Account Number (IBAN) of his or her bank.

  • Choose your payment method and confirm the money transfer.

Is IBAN the same as SWIFT?

No, IBAN and SWIFT are 2 different codes, but both of these do the same job – sending or receiving money. Banks use SWIFT codes to identify bank branches for making international payments. On the other hand, IBAN codes specify individual bank accounts for both domestic and international payments.

  • Do I need an IBAN number or a SWIFT code?

It depends on the country to which you’re sending money. For example, banks in the US, Australia, and New Zealand don’t use IBAN numbers, but they use SWIFT codes for different banking services.  But if you’re wiring money to a country within the Eurozone, you’ll surely need a SWIFT/ BIC code along with an IBAN number.

Is a SWIFT/ BIC code the same as a sort code?

Nope, sort codes aren’t the same as SWIFT codes. Sort codes are 6-digit codes that help British and Irish banks to identify bank branches for domestic payments (payments within a country).

  • Do all banks use BIC/ SWIFT codes?

No, all financial institutions, especially some small banks and credit unions, don’t have SWIFT codes. Instead, these institutions contact banks that do have BIC/ SWIFT codes, and ask them to serve as intermediaries for wiring money. You might also come across some financial institutions that use SWIFT for only a certain number of their branches, and not all of them.

Is a SWIFT code the same for all branches?

It depends on the recipient’s bank. Some banks may have one BIC/ SWIFT code for all their branches, while others have unique SWIFT codes for each of their branches. Plus, since all the branches of a bank may or may not use the SWIFT network, the code usually specifies the bank’s head office or primary office. So, are you ready to make an international money transfer using a BIC/ SWIFT code? Download the Xe app or sign up today!

 

Get in touch with XE.com

About XE.com

XE can help safeguard your profit margins and improve cashflow through quantifying the FX risk you face and implementing unique strategies to mitigate it. XE Business Solutions provides a comprehensive range of currency services and products to help businesses access competitive rates with greater control.

Deciding when to make an international payment and at what rate can be critical. XE Business Solutions work with businesses to protect bottom-line from exchange rate fluctuations, while the currency experts and risk management specialists act as eyes and ears in the market to protect your profits from the world’s volatile currency markets.

Your company money is safe with XE, their NASDAQ listed parent company, Euronet Worldwide Inc., has a multi billion-dollar market capitalization, and an investment grade credit rating. With offices in the UK, Canada, Europe, APAC and North America they have a truly global coverage.

Are you curious to know more about XE?
Maurits Houthoff, senior business development manager at XE.com, is always in for a cup of coffee, mail or call to provide you detailed information.

 

 

Visit XE.com

Visit XE partner page

 

 

 

What’s the difference between a neobank and a challenger bank?

19-11-2020 | treasuryXL | XE |

The presence or absence of a banking license is the biggest difference between neobanks and challenger banks, but it’s not the only difference.

Most banks began looking into online services shortly after 9/11 brought air travel to a sudden and screeching halt. They wanted a way to move money which did not involve placing paper checks on airplanes. Internet-based banking, or mostly internet-based banking, was the next logical step. According to some recent market research, neobanks and challenger banks will be worth over $470 billion USD by 2027. Frequently, people use these terms interchangeably. However, there are some significant differences between neobanks and challenger banks. Challenger banks are mostly online, and neobanks are exclusively online.

But while the presence of physical locations (and lack thereof) is an important distinction between neobanks and challenger banks, it isn’t the only difference between the two bank types. There are several differences to note, as these differences often have a direct bearing on which one is best for your family or business.

Difference #1: physical presence

Think of it like this. Many retailers, like Walmart, have both a physical and an online presence. Other retailers, like Amazon, are exclusively online. Challenger banks and neobanks are basically the same. But the Walmart comparison only goes so far. Most challenger banks only have a handful of physical locations, as their online services are their main draw. Furthermore, most of these physical locations are in the UK. After the 2008 financial crisis, the government opened the market to new banks.

Neobanks, on the other hand, first appeared in 2017 as a way to fill the niche between traditional banks and FinTechs. Less than four years later, there are hundreds of these institutions in the UK, U.S., and worldwide.

Difference #2: accounts, products, and services

There are some other differences as well. Typically, challenger banks offer both personal and business accounts. Moreover, challenger banks streamline their products and services, so they can be more internet-friendly. Challenger banks are small institutions which “challenged” the Big Four UK banks (Barclay’s, Lloyd’s, HSBC, and RBS). Their technology-based services and commitment to markets traditionally under served by the Big Four quickly attracted legions of customers.

While neobanks do offer some personal accounts and services, they usually target small and medium-sized businesses (SMEs) and business startups. They present themselves not just as banks, but as online financial technology firms, and typically appeal to more tech-savvy customers.

Difference #3: banking license

What’s the difference between a psychiatrist and a psychologist? It’s not their sense of humor, or lack thereof. Psychiatrists can prescribe medication, and psychologists can only provide therapy.

That’s also the major difference between challenger banks and neobanks. Most challenger banks have such a limited physical presence that they are essentially 100 percent online. But challenger banks have banking licenses and neobanks do not. So, only challenger banks can offer a full range of financial services. That includes things like issuing credit cards and loaning money. Neobanks can offer these services as well, but only if they are tied to a licensed institution.

There is some overlap. Many neobanks essentially began as FinTechs. Then, once regulators approved their banking license requests, they became challenger banks.

Some examples of challenger banks and neobanks

Formed in 1995, Richard Branson’s Virgin Money is one of the oldest challenger banks in the UK. It also has locations in Australia and South Africa. Between 2007 and 2010, Virgin Money also operated in the U.S. A private equity group began Aldermore in 2009. The online institution bought Ruffler Bank a few months later, so the neobank became a challenger bank almost overnight. Aldermore is also the poster boy of this sector’s growth. South African financial conglomerate FirstRand recently bought Aldermore for a staggering £1.1 billion.

Durham, England’s Atom Bank was the UK’s first online financial institution to tailor its platform to tablets and smartphones, as opposed to PCs. It was also the first 100 percent digital bank to receive a banking license. Shortly thereafter, international banking giant BBVA acquired a large stake in Atom Bank. As a result, it expanded its financial services to include residential mortgages, competitive savings accounts, and secured business loans.

Founded in 1996, First Internet Bancorp was one of the first FDIC-insured, state-chartered financial institutions in the United States with a 100 percent online presence. It mostly offers retail services, like checking accounts, and securities investments. Customers also have access to installment loans, personal lines of credit, and other financial services. Chetwood Financial Services is an example of a limited challenger bank. It offers most financial services, with the exception of residential mortgages. Regulators do not allow CFS to issue any buy-to-let residential mortgages. Civilised Bank, which is now known as Allicia Bank, is in the same boat. It offers a single financial product, a twelve-month savings account, by virtue of a limited Part 4a UK license.

In 2010, General Motors Assurance Corporation, GM’s financing arm and a free-standing financial services company, became Ally Financial. Not surprisingly, Ally focuses on auto leasing and financing. It has close to five million such customers. In 2016 and again in 2019, the company significantly expanded its mortgage lending business. Ally is affiliated with Via, an online vehicle auction site.

San Francisco-based Good Money sends half its profits to social justice and environmental preservation groups. Accountholders cast ballots to decide where Good Money invests. The bank offers a range of FDIC-insured products, mostly DDA checking and savings accounts. As of January 2019, there was a waiting list to be a Good Money customer. All new customers also have the option of purchasing a stake in the company. Credit Suisse X is the online arm of the venerable Zurich-based investment bank. Its online banking services are targeted to individuals with high incomes. Online financial institutions are more able to go after specific market segments.

Use Xe to make international money transfers

Neobanks and challenger banks are good options for customers who want an all-online or mostly-online experience. But they are not a very good option for international money transfers. Traditionally, bank fees are rather high in this area, and you may not get the best exchange rates for your transfers.

Money transfer providers, such as XE, are neither neobanks nor challenger banks. Xe does not try to be all things to all people. Instead, we focus on electronic funds transfers in general, and international electronic funds transfers in particular. We have worked very hard to develop a platform that’s both convenient and secure. As a bonus, we are also able to offer fast money transfers (some taking just a few minutes) and competitive exchange rates.

 

Get in touch with XE.com

About XE.com

XE can help safeguard your profit margins and improve cashflow through quantifying the FX risk you face and implementing unique strategies to mitigate it. XE Business Solutions provides a comprehensive range of currency services and products to help businesses access competitive rates with greater control.

Deciding when to make an international payment and at what rate can be critical. XE Business Solutions work with businesses to protect bottom-line from exchange rate fluctuations, while the currency experts and risk management specialists act as eyes and ears in the market to protect your profits from the world’s volatile currency markets.

Your company money is safe with XE, their NASDAQ listed parent company, Euronet Worldwide Inc., has a multi billion-dollar market capitalization, and an investment grade credit rating. With offices in the UK, Canada, Europe, APAC and North America they have a truly global coverage.

Are you curious to know more about XE?
Maurits Houthoff, senior business development manager at XE.com, is always in for a cup of coffee, mail or call to provide you detailed information.

 

 

Visit XE.com

Visit XE partner page

 

 

 

When Dealing with Foreign Exchange, Don’t Forget About Compliance

12-11-2020 | treasuryXL | XE |

What’s the most common problem in foreign exchange? It may not be glamorous, but one of the most common problems is regulatory delay—and it can have a major impact on your supply chain, cash flow, and relationships with suppliers and customers.

In the previous installments of our blog series on foreign exchange risk management, we’ve discussed several of the most common (and costly) mistakes that businesses make when making international payments and dealing with foreign currencies. Today, we want to take a closer look at regulatory compliance: what it is, what you need to do to be compliant, and what can happen to your business if you don’t take the necessary steps.

What do you need to know?

Financial institutions and other FX providers must comply with strict regulations while conducting foreign exchange transactions on behalf of their customers. Under know-your-customer (KYC) and anti-money laundering (AML) rules, they are required to verify the identities of all the parties they deal with, including the foreign parties with which your business may have contact. Additionally, there are overseas banking details to consider. While bank identifiers in the UK, for example, are standardised around account numbers and sort codes, the equivalents vary from country to country internationally. Depending on where you’re doing business, you may need to deal with data such as international bank account numbers (IBANs) and bank identifier codes (BICs).

The bottom line: your foreign exchange providers will legally require certain information so that they can transact on your behalf, and your business will need robust processes in place to generate said information and ensure that there aren’t any delays in business.

What happens if you don’t have the right policies in place?

Regulatory delay is one of the most common (and expensive) FX problems for businesses. If your business doesn’t know what it needs to do to be compliant and have policies and procedures in place to ensure that all business is up to regulatory standards, then you could see consequences. What’s the most likely outcome? Your payments won’t go through on time. Consider how that could impact your business, your cash flow, your supply chain, and your relationships.

What can an FX provider do?

If you’re not well-versed in everything you have to do to remain compliant while conducting business as usual, a specialist FX provider is the way to go. An FX provider can help you handle the various regulatory requirements and remain compliant in every country that you do business with.

For example, do you have online systems in place to automate data entry and quickly identify mistakes or missing information that may get in the way of your payments being made on time? Does your provider offer simple, easy-to-understand advice on the information you require from foreign counterparties and where to find it? Can you store payment details so you don’t have to keep re-entering them each time a transaction is due (and potentially leave room for human error)?

You don’t need to be an expert on regulatory compliance. However, if your business engages in any degree of foreign exchange, then you will need to pay special attention to regulatory compliance. If you don’t currently have the knowledge or resources to take care of compliance on your own, an FX provider is the way to go to ensure that your business won’t be disrupted by regulatory delay.

Get in touch with XE.com

About XE.com

XE can help safeguard your profit margins and improve cashflow through quantifying the FX risk you face and implementing unique strategies to mitigate it. XE Business Solutions provides a comprehensive range of currency services and products to help businesses access competitive rates with greater control.

Deciding when to make an international payment and at what rate can be critical. XE Business Solutions work with businesses to protect bottom-line from exchange rate fluctuations, while the currency experts and risk management specialists act as eyes and ears in the market to protect your profits from the world’s volatile currency markets.

Your company money is safe with XE, their NASDAQ listed parent company, Euronet Worldwide Inc., has a multi billion-dollar market capitalization, and an investment grade credit rating. With offices in the UK, Canada, Europe, APAC and North America they have a truly global coverage.

Are you curious to know more about XE?
Maurits Houthoff, senior business development manager at XE.com, is always in for a cup of coffee, mail or call to provide you detailed information.

 

 

Visit XE.com

Visit XE partner page

 

 

 

What is remittance?

05-11-2020 | treasuryXL | XE |

Remittance payments, which are essentially sending money home, are easier than ever when you choose Xe.

In a nutshell, payment remittances are expatriates sending part or all of their foreign wages to friends or family back home. Technically, remittance can be defined as any such payments, whether or not the money crosses an international border. But in almost all cases, when people talk about money remittances, they are talking about financial transfers, usually wages, from a developed country to a developing country.

Many people are surprised to learn that developing nations receive more capital from money remittances than from any other source. For example, in 2018, low- and middle-income countries received about $345 billion USD in foreign aid and foreign investment. Financial remittances to these countries exceeded $525 billion USD.

Most of these remittances were transfers to individuals. Many countries, most notably India, China, and the Philippines, have large overseas diasporas. Additionally, many companies have more international connections than ever, making remittances more common.

When you choose a remittance of funds provider, convenience, cost, and security are usually the three most important factors. Xe remittances feature all these things. Our online portal, which features bank-grade security, is available to account-holders 24/7/365. Furthermore, we do not charge additional fees for many electronic transfers to one of the 130+ countries we are connected to.

What should you know about remittances?

The aforementioned convenience is the biggest remittance pro. Many transfers require only a few minutes. Additionally, the currency transfer is usually seamless. The sender transfers native currency, and the recipients usually gets the funds in native currency.

Largely because of the high volume of remittance transfers, there are occasionally calls for better regulation. Since many international transfers are under the radar, remittances are a popular tool for money launderers and terrorist financiers. For these reasons, FinTech companies like Xe keep a close eye on transfers to multiple different recipients or transfers to organizations instead of individuals.

On a related note, many people send money to groups, or join groups, which have hidden sinister agendas. Technically, these links run afoul of American and international laws and standards. But if your affiliation is tied to one specific aspect of that group, such as its support for refugees, you are typically okay.

High fees for small transfers are an issue as well. The average provider charges over 7 percent for transfers of $200 or less. That’s significantly higher than the average fee for larger transfers. Low income families are very vulnerable in this area. Seven cents out of every dollar is not much for wealthy families, but could be a week’s worth of gasoline for a poor family.

In addition to the fee, many countries directly tax remittance payments. These rules obviously vary significantly in different places. Additionally, even if the remittance is a gift, it is normally taxable income.

Understanding the Terms and Conditions

We won’t deny it: financial language can get a little dry. Frequently, remittance transfer agreements involve so much technical jargon that they appear to be in a different language. Here are some common remittance terms and what they mean:

  • ABA Number

    All American banks, and most foreign banks, have nine digit codes used in electronic transfers. If you do not know the ABA number, a/k/a the routing number, ask Google. You might also need your account number, and if you don’t know that, you’ll probably need to visit a branch in person.

  • AML

    As mentioned, money laundering is a serious problem in this area. So, many institutions have Anti Money Laundering protocols. These protocols usually involve transfer limits and transaction verification.

  • KYC

    Similarly, many institutions have Know Your Customer protocols. Common KYC items include text message verification, username/password authentication, and security questions, like your mother’s maiden name.

  • Recall

    If you transfer funds in error, it’s technically possible to cancel the transaction and retrieve the money. But the process is complex and there are no guarantees. So it’s best to get it right the first time.

The more comfortable you are with the lingo, the easier it is to send a remittance abroad.

How to send a remittance

Cash pickup, usually through a company like Western Union, electronic transfers, usually through a FinTech like Xe, and bank transfers are the most common forms of remittance payments.

In terms of the infrastructure, most remittances use Society for Worldwide International Financial Telecommunication (SWIFT) or Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT). Most cash and bank transfers use the SWIFT network. These transfers often involve a third party. These third parties do not work for free, so the fee could be higher. Xe and other online institutions normally use EFT transfers. Generally, these transfers are much more direct.

Cash pickup is usually the fastest and cheapest way to remit money overseas. It’s also the most cumbersome and least convenient way. Most recipients can only use cash for some in-person transactions. And, transferees must always travel somewhere to receive their money. On the other hand, bank transfers are extremely convenient. However, they are only available to certain people.

On the plus side, cash and bank transfers normally accept many different payment methods, such as cash, credit/debit card, cash, money order, wire transfer, or even personal check. These options normally require face-to-face transfers, as such payment methods are difficult or impossible to use online.

Xe remittances essentially combine the low cost and fast speed of cash transfers with the convenience of bank transfers. That combination makes Xe an excellent way to send money overseas.

 

Get in touch with XE.com

About XE.com

XE can help safeguard your profit margins and improve cashflow through quantifying the FX risk you face and implementing unique strategies to mitigate it. XE Business Solutions provides a comprehensive range of currency services and products to help businesses access competitive rates with greater control.

Deciding when to make an international payment and at what rate can be critical. XE Business Solutions work with businesses to protect bottom-line from exchange rate fluctuations, while the currency experts and risk management specialists act as eyes and ears in the market to protect your profits from the world’s volatile currency markets.

Your company money is safe with XE, their NASDAQ listed parent company, Euronet Worldwide Inc., has a multi billion-dollar market capitalization, and an investment grade credit rating. With offices in the UK, Canada, Europe, APAC and North America they have a truly global coverage.

Are you curious to know more about XE?
Maurits Houthoff, senior business development manager at XE.com, is always in for a cup of coffee, mail or call to provide you detailed information.

 

 

Visit XE.com

Visit XE partner page